Sunday morning, May 31, sermon preached by Pastor McLaughlin.

Introduction

It started bout 8 to 10 years ago. It went unnoticed at first. Even though I was looking at myself in the mirror every day, I didn't notice a little bump on my head. It probably went unnoticed for the most part because there was no pain associated with it and because it grew so slowly. However about 5 years ago, I started to notice this bump. Again, not because of any pain, but because now my hairline was receding and because it seemed larger. Well, it finally came time to go to the doctor and get the news on what it is and how to fix it. 

The cocoa shared that the bump was just an annoying cyst of some kind, however the procedure to remove ti would be far more difficult now than if I had come in 5 years ago when it was smaller. That sounds familiar doesn't it? Sin rarely started out as a "large" noticeable issue in our lies, it seems very manageable at the time, but then we find that it takes over our lives rather quickly. The church today does a rather good job of identifying sin within our culture. There is no shortage of outrage over the evils of our society as swells as it should be. But what seems amazing is the fact of what sins we allow to go unchecked in our lives. 

Main Truth: The church should be cornered not only with the "major sins" of our society, but also with the sins we tend to "minimize" within the church and the lives of the saints. 

1. Sin _____ the Fall

2. Sin _____ Us All

3. Jesus _____ It All

Conclusion

It all started with a choice in a garden. The sin that day would not have seemed like huge descent into evil to us, but it as the sin that ruined and caused every other sin. Thankfully, there was another choice made in another garden where our final representative made the choice to trust His Heavenly Father. he paid the price for every sin because the price for every sin is death. Today, we rejoice in the finished work of Jesus for our sin and we desire, by His grace, to have clean lives, even from the sins that we tend to tolerate, excuse, and minimize in our own lives.